Major Courses

101-102. PHYS ICAL SCIENCE (Credit, 4 Hours each semester)(Lecture, 3 hours; Lab., 2 hours). A survey course in physical science treating the most basic principles, concepts, and developments in physics, astronomy, chemistry and geology. This course is not intended for students who plan to major in one of the physical sciences and cannot be substituted for basic courses in any of these fields.


141-142. ELEMENTS OF PHYSICS (Credit, 4 Hours each semester) (lecture, 2 hours; Lab & Rec. 4 hours). An introduction to the basic concepts, principles and models in physics. Prerequisite: Mathematics 130 or equivalent. No previous course in physics is necessary


145. DISCOVERY IN PHYSICS (Credit, 3 Hours) (Lecture, 2 Hours; Recitation, 2 hours). A review and an extension of the fundamentals in algebra, geometry, and trigonometry. These notions are applied to study vectors, static equilibrium, kinematics, and the dynamics of a single particle. Corequisite: Mathematics 140.


150. QUANTITATlVE REASONING IN PHYSICS (Credit, 3 hours)(Lecture, 2 hours; Recitation, 2 hours). A rigorous study of the dynamics of a system of particles, energy and momenta conservation laws, gravitation , and their applications. Prerequisite: Physics 145 or equivalent, Corequisite: Mathematics 264


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201-202. EARTH SCIENCE I AND ll (Credit, 4 Hours each semester)(Lecture, 3 hour s; Lab., 2 hours). Study of earth with emphasis on its internal constitution and processes that affect it. History of earth including the development of the atmosphere and life. Elementary study of gravitational, magnetic, seismic, electr ical and thermal properties of the earth.


206. INTRODUCTION TO ASTRONOMY(Credit, 4 Hours)(Lecture, 2 hours, Lab., 3 hours ). A descriptive course in fundamental principles of the solar and stellar systems. Prerequisite: Mathematics 140 or equivalent.


221-222. GENERAL PHYSICS (Credit, 5 Hours each semester).(Lecture, 3 hours; Lab., 2 hours; Problem solving session, 2 hours). An introduction to the basic concepts, principles, and models in classical physics intended for science and engineering majors. Skills in the elementary theoretical and experimental methods of physics are developed while stdying such topics as mechanics, thermodynamics, electricity and magnetism, waves and optics. Prerequisite: Mathematics 264 for Physics 221, and Mathematics 265 for Physics 222.


251-252. INTERMEDIATE PHYSICS I AND ll (Credit, 5 Hours each semester)(Lecture, 3 hours; Lab., 2 hours; Recitation, 2 hours). A systematic presentation of the principles and methods of classical physics intended for physics majors. Theoretical and experimental skills will be developed through the study of classical mechanics (a review), thermodynamics (including elementary statistical physics) , electricity, magnetism, electromagnetic phenomena, wave phenomena, optics, special relativity, and the application of mechanics and electrodynamics theory. Prerequisite: Physics 145, 150, or departmental permission. Corequisite : Mathematics 265.


271. MODERN PHYSICS (Credit, 3 Hours). A study of selected phenomena in solid state, molecular, atomic, and nuclear physics and quantum optics and their explanation on the basis of current physical theory. This course is designed as a sequel to Physics 221-222. Prerequisites: Physics 221-222 or Physics 141-142 along with departmental permission. Corequisite: Mathematics 265.


281-282. RADIATION PHYSICS I AND II (Credit, 4 Hours). Interaction of radiation with matter, nuclear energy, x-radiation, principles of radiation protection and exposure, public health, radiation instrumentation and measurement. Prerequisites: Physics 251-252 or Physics 221- 222 or Physics 141-142.


< p> 311. MATHEMATICAL PHYSICS (Credit, 3 Hours). Method of formulating and solving physical problems that involve the use of mathematical tools such as coordinate systems and transformation, Fourier series and orthogonal functions, complex variables, ordinary differential equations, matrices and partial differential equations. Prerequisite: Physics 222 or 252, Mathematics 265.

332. THE PHYSICS OF WAVES (Credit, 3 Hours). A course of varying content on topics selected from the classical theory of waves and its applications in optics and acoustics. Prerequisite: Physics 251-252 or 221-222 with departmental permision.


341-342. EXPERIMENTAL PHYSICS I AND II (Credit, 3 Hours each semester)(Lecture, 1 hour; Lab., 5 hours). A course in the techniques of experimental physics, including a selection of experiments involving radiation physics and quantitative evaluations of physical phenomena. Prerequisite: Ten hours of introductory physics.


345. THERMODYNAMICS AND STATISTICAL MECHANICS (Credit, 3 hours). Macroscopic thermodynamics, kinetic theory, transport phenomena, probability, and classical statistical mechanics with applications to equilibrium phenomena. Prerequisites: Physics 251-252 and 311 or equivalent.


381-382. BIOPHYSICS I AND II (Credit, 5 Hours, each semester). Applications of physical principles and instrumentation in biophysical measurements. Biological hazards associated with ionizing, radiation, main features of safety in the field of radiation, environmental hazards. Prerequisites: Physics 251-252, Physics 221-222, or equivalent.


400. COMPUTAIONAL PHYSICS (Credit, 3 Hours). This course is geared toward the utilization of the computer to solve physics problems. Intermediate and advanced undergraduate topics in mechanics, electromagnetism, quantum mechanics, statistical mechanics, and mathematical physics arr covered in conjunction with simulation and numerical solution methods of key physics equations. Prerequisite: Physics 311 or equivalent.


^M 405.THE PHYSICS AND TECHNOLOGY OF ENERGY(Credit, 3 Hours) A survey course on the essence, production, and utilization of energy and related issues that include environmental ones; fundamental and common forms of energy and related sources (fossil, solar, nuclear, etc.); transformations and utilization of energy and the related environmental issues; working principles of selected energy transformation technologies; notes on global energy balance and its implications. Prerequisite: Two-Semester Sequence of physis (mechanics & electromagnetism).


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^M 411 ADVANCED MATHEMATICAL PHYSICS (Credit, 3 Hours). Application of probability and statistics, partial differential equations, special functions, and integral equations to selected problems in physics. Prerequisite: Physics 311 or equivalent.


416-417. ADVANCED MECHANICS I AND II (Credit, 3 Hours each semester). Mechanics of one particle and a system of particles, Lagrange's equation, rigid body motion, relativistic mechanics, mechanics of continuous media, Hamiltonian mechanics, theory of small osciallations and field theory. Prerequisites: Physics 251-252, or Physics 221-222 and departmental permission Corequisite: Physics 311 for 416. Prerequisite for Physics 417 is Physics 416


425-426. ADVANCED ELECTROMAGNETIC THEORY I AND II (Credit, 3 Hours each semester). Electrostatics, magnetostatics, electric current and circuits, electromagnetic induction, Maxwell's equations, electrical and magnetic properties of matter, electromagnetic waves and their radiation, propagation, reflection, and diffraction, charged particle dynamics and relativistic effects. Prerequisite: Physics 311.


435.QUANTUM PHYSICS I (Credit, 3 hours). Review of the classical foundations of quantum theory, interpretation of some crucial experimental results, and the mathematical formulation of quantum mechanics. Prerequisites: Physics 271, 311 and 417.


436. QUANTUM PHYSICS II (Credit, 3 hours). Application of elementary quantum mechanics and elementary quantum statistical mechanics to realistic systems in solid state, molecular, atomic, and nuclear physics. Prerequisite: Physics 435.


441-442. ADVANCED PHYSICAL MEASUREMENTS (Credit, 3 Hours each semester) mester) (Lecture, 1 hour; Lab.,6 hours). Advanced laboratory techniques with special emphasis on electronics, solid state devices, electromagnetic radiation, radioactivity, and the utilization of analog and digital computers. Prerequisites: Physics 341-342.


462. SPACE PHYSICS (Credit, 3 Hours). A course of varying content on topics seleted from atmospheric physics, the physics of space flight and exploration, and theoretical astrophysics. Prerequisites: Physics 416 and 425.


472. SOLID-STATE PHYSICS (Credit, 3 Hours). A study of solid-state phenomena including crystal structure, thermal, electrical, and magnetic properties of solids, electron emission from metals and semiconductors using simple theeoretical models. Prerequisite: Physics 345.


491. SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN PHYSICS (Credit, 1 Hours). A course for advanced students on selected topics and experimental and theoretical physics. Projects associated with the current departmental research can be undertaken by qualified students. Schedule is arranged according to varying content of the course.


492.SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN PHYSICS (Credit, 2 Hours). A course for advanced students on selected topics and experimental and theoretical physics. Projects associated with the current departmental research can be undertaken by qualified students. Schedule is arranged according to varying content of the course.


493.SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN PHYSICS (Credit, 3 Hours). A course for advanced students on selected topics and experimental and theoretical physics. Projects associated with the current departmental research can be undertaken by qualified students. Schedule is arranged according to varying content of the course.


494.SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN PHYSICS (Credit, 3 Hours). A course for advanced students on selected topics and experimental and theoretical physics. Projects associated with the current departmental research can be undertaken by qualified students. Schedule is arranged according to varying content of the course.


495. SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN PHYSICS (Credit, 3 Hours). A course for advanced students on selected topics and experimental and theoretical physics. Projects associated with the current departmental research can be undertaken by qualified students. Schedule is arranged according to varying content of the course.


496. SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN PHYSICS (Credit, 3 Hours). A course for advanced students on selected topics and experimental and theoretical physics. Projects associated with the current departmental research can be undertaken by qualified students. Schedule is arranged according to varying content of the course.