Institutionalizing Systemic Mentoring

 

Mentoring -- an enabling process for quality learning
A significant other for career development and personal growth
The strong coupling between instruction and research
The Summary Narrative of a
Final Report Submitted to
Dr. Alexandra King
Program Officer
US Presidential Award for Excellence in Science, Mathematics
and Engineering Mentoring (US-PAESMEM)
(NSF Grant No. HRD-9612453)
With a Complimentary Copy to
Dr. Wanda E. Ward
Office of the Deputy Director
National Science Foundation (NSF)
By
Diola Bagayoko, Ph.D.
Professor of Physics and Chancellor’s Fellow
Director, the Timbuktu Academy
Southern University and A&M College
Baton Rouge, LA 70813
Bagayoko@phys.subr.edu
Notes & Acknowledgments

The institutionalization of systemic mentoring, as described in this report, was presented by Bagayoko at the Duke University National Conference on Mentoring. This description is intended to provide individuals and institutions with items, materials, programs, and processes worth replication. The Timbuktu Academy is funded by the Department of the Navy, Office of Naval Research (ONR), NSF, and NASA.

Fall, 1998
SUMMARY OF COMPLETED PROJECT

The objectives of this project were to recognize, support, expand, and hopefully institutionalize the student mentoring activities and program, i.e., the Timbuktu Academy, led by Dr. Diola Bagayoko. He was one of the first ten (10) individual recipients of the US Presidential Award for Excellence in Science, Mathematics, and Engineering Mentoring (US-PAESMEM, NSF Grant No. HRD-9612453). The project added immensely to the recognition of the mentoring activities of Bagayoko and particularly of the importance of mentoring. This recognition was accomplished through more than ten (10) mass-media publications with a combined distribution list over 41,000 readers, over half of whom were in academia (pre-college and college). The clearly significant value added created by this award includes the following. (a) Seven (7) papers and one (1) book published by Bagayoko and his colleagues partly serve to place mentoring on a rigorous scientific basis. (b) Using the knowledge base provided by these publications and others, Bagayoko and colleagues expanded and institutionalized "systemic mentoring" throughout Southern University and A&M College, in Baton Rouge, with the active support of university administrators. (c) In support of mentoring and of this expansion process, Bagayoko made twenty three (23) presentations from fall, 1996 to fall 1998; they included thirteen (13) national, seven (7) state-wide, and three (3) university-wide presentations that respectively reached 785, 347, and 563 individuals (faculty, students, parents, and others). (d) The journey continues with the replication of the model of the Timbuktu Academy in the State, through the Louisiana Alliance for Minority Participation (LAMP), and at some institutions across the nation. (e) Details on the aforementioned processes and publications are available at the web site of the Timbuktu Academy, under "Virtual Mentoring Institute." This mentoring resource base, partly a product of this project, is one of the guideposts for our challenging and rewarding journey of effective and systemic mentoring (http://suphys.phys.subr.edu/phys/timbuktu.htm).
 

BRIEF NARRATIVE REPORT

Introduction

The following summary, in outline format, provides an overview of the major mentoring activities of Bagayoko and his many colleagues from the fall of 1996 to that of 1998. The reader is invited to visit the web site of the Timbuktu Academy for an expanded description of its objectives, paradigm, programs, activities, results (graduates and new knowledge), and funding sources (http://suphys.phys.subr.edu/phys/timbuktu.htm). A recommended reading that establishes the scientific basis for high expectations for all students (or individuals) is "the dynamic of student retention: a review and a prescription." Education, Vol. 115, No. 1, pp. 31-39, Fall, 1994. This publication provides a motivational, design, and organizing principle of Bagayoko’s mentoring programs and activities.

The importance of the US-PAESMEM program will hopefully be apparent in this summary. This summary addresses the following points: the press coverage, the statewide recognition, the institutionalization of systemic mentoring at Southern University and A&M College (SUBR), and the enhanced 1996-98 mentoring activities of the Timbuktu Academy. Some emphasis is placed on the institutionalization of systemic mentoring at SUBR and a possible roadmap for replication.

Press Coverage & Recognition

In September, 1996, Dr. George Campbell, the president of NACME, noted the importance of appropriate dissemination of information on matters that count. Following his advice, I provided the award information, after the ceremony in Washington, to individuals, agencies, and organizations that support the Timbuktu Academy and to members of the press. As a result, the award program and my receipt of the US-PAESMEM were featured in a number of mass-media publications that included the following.

(1) The SU Digest, the campus newspaper that is disseminated nation-wide to many alumni and others; circulation: over 10,000;

(2) The Daily Reveille, the campus newspaper of Louisiana State University (from which I earned my Ph.D. under the direction of a great mentor, the late Boyd Professor Joseph Callaway); circulation: over 25,000;

(3) The Advocate, the main statewide newspaper in Louisiana; circulation: statewide and beyond;

(4) SU Insider, the glossy newsletter published by the Office of the Chancellor of Southern University and A&M College in Baton Rouge (SUBR);

(5) Research Dividends, a glossy and statewide newsletter published by the Louisiana Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR)– funded by the National Science Foundation and the Louisiana Board of Regents;

(6) The newsletter of the National Society of Black Physicists (NSBP), with a national distribution list;

(7) APS News, a monthly publication of the American Physical Society (APS); worldwide circulation estimated to reach 10,000 physicists around the world;

(8) The newsletter of the New York Academy of Science, of which Bagayoko is a member;

(9) Frontiers, a national newsletter published by the National Science Foundation (NSF) and that enjoys national dissemination; and

(10) Resource Magazine, a national publication of the American Society of Agricultural Engineering.

(If mentoring is really important, then make it part of the daily discourse.)

Oh, one interesting thing about press coverage is that it has its way of not only spreading the word, but also of making the "star" wonder what he/she has done lately to earn this attention! (B. F. Skinner was right about the "power of positive reinforcement.")

The above coverage was critical in conveying not only the importance of the award, but also that of mentoring – as intimated in the subtitles of this outline.

Special State-Wide Recognition

The Louisiana Collaborative for Excellence in the Preparation of Teachers (LaCEPT) and the Louisiana Systemic Initiatives (LaSIP), with the active support of the staff of the Board of Regents, recognized Bagayoko for the US-PAESMEM with a magnificent plaque shaped like the map of Louisiana, during the annual conference of LaCEPT in early 1997.

Institutionalization of Systemic Mentoring at SUBR

Perhaps the most significant, far-reaching development in Bagayoko’s mentoring activities consists of his contributions to the institutionalization of systemic mentoring at SUBR. These contributions, undoubtedly, benefited from the authority "vested" in him, in matters of mentoring, by the US Presidential Award for Excellence in Science, Mathematics, and Engineering Mentoring (US-PAESMEM).

Several circumstances contributed to this institutionalization. They include the generally nurturing environment one can find on most Historically Black College and University (HBCU) campuses. Another key factor has been the lead role of SUBR in the implementation of the NSF supported Louisiana Alliance for Minority Participation (LAMP), for which the State Board of Regents is the grantee and a major provider of funding. As spelled our in the award instrument for LAMP, its objectives include: (LAMP is one of approximately 25 "Louis Stokes Alliances for Minority Participation.")

    1. Doubling the number of minority students earning BS degrees in science,
engineering, and mathematics (SEM); (b) Enhancing the quality of these graduates and guide more than 20% of them to graduate school – with emphasis on the successful pursuit of the Ph.D. degree;
    1. Enhancing the SEM infrastructure of participating institutions for furthering the attainment of objectives (a) and (b) and for institutionalization.
The proposal for the establishment of LAMP clearly shows that while other factors (i.e., infrastructure for instruction and research) are relevant for the attainment of these objectives, increased student retention and graduation rates, as compared to the baseline figures of 1994-95, are indispensable. So, we decided to focus on quality teaching and systemic mentoring for the promotion of scholastic and research excellence: then, enhanced academic achievements and increased student retention, graduation, and graduate school attendance rates become expected by-products!) With the above background, the sequence of events that led to the institutionalization of systemic mentoring at SUBR follows.
  1. Bagayoko and colleagues prepared and presented, to the SUBR Faculty Senate, arguments that explored the need for and benefits from systemic mentoring – for the implementation of LAMP, for the sake of our students, and for institutional competitiveness (in an era of electronic and virtual universities). The Faculty Senate unanimously voted for the establishment of systemic mentoring in SEM units by January, 1997 and in the other departments by the fall of 1997. Bagayoko has been serving as president of the Faculty Senate from fall, 1996 to fall, 2000. (There is no substitute to the rigorous establishment, in writing, of the merit of anything that is to require significant time and efforts; this is particularly true for enlisting the participation and support of faculty members.)
  2. The Faculty Senate presented its plan to the administration – with written arguments. The Administration embraced the plan and noted that it has already been moving in this direction!
  3. (In a thinking and progressive organization, positive initiatives may be proposed by any group of competent and dedicated constituents.) The alternative is to have groups blame each others for the ills while most of them seem to be "majoring in the minors."

  4. A campus-wide conference in January of 1997, attended by all faculty members, addressed the establishment of systemic mentoring. Several workshops, including a major one on August 22, 1997, continue to be devoted to student mentoring and to faculty mentoring! Every participant at these sessions received authoritative papers that thoroughly examine scholarly and mundane reasons and intricacies of mentoring. (If mentoring is really important, then provide professional development opportunities for prospective and continuing mentors!) The web site of the Timbuktu Academy and several others provide extensive information on mentoring, for current or prospective mentors or mentees (http://suphys.phys.subr.edu/phys/timbuktu.htm).
  1. As of January, 1997, one quarter time release (from teaching) has been provided to mentoring coordinators in the SEM units – one per department. Under the leadership of Dr. Mildred Smalley, the Campus Coordinator of LAMP activities at SUBR, extensive training and materials continue to be provided to these coordinators. Timbuktu Academy and GEM mentoring materials, among others, are provided to individual faculty members. A coordinator works with faculty members to promote, support, and enhance their mentoring activities. (Meaningful changes often require time and effort on a sustained basis. A support system, a cornerstone of mentoring, is a ubiquitous part of the "ecosystem" of productive individuals.)
  2. The faculty Senate requested, in 1997, the adoption of a departmental and college annual report format that totally record the work and results in student mentoring. The Office of Academic Affairs issued this new format for the annual report of departments, colleges, and schools. Extensive data on student mentoring activities and results, including longitudinal and follow-up data and information, are required by this format. (What is important should be in the annual report or in attachments to it, in quantitative and qualitative terms!)
  3. Mentoring, as of the fall of 1996, was already an explicit criterion, among others, for merit raises for faculty members. (If mentoring is really important, then make it part of the reward system.)
(6) Advisement was already an explicit criterion for tenure and promotion. Revisions of this criterion, including renaming it as mentoring/advisement, are continuing. The Faculty Senate is leading the revision efforts. (If student mentoring is really important, then make it part of the incentive structures.) Oh, the reward system is only a part of the incentive structure; the latter also includes negative incentives! Please note that (5) and (6) have no real meaning without (4), i.e., valid, reliable, and comprehensive reporting, a pre-requisite for accountability.
  1. In the summer of 1998, the Council of Academic Deans voted unanimously to institute "systemic mentoring" throughout the academic departments, colleges, and schools at SUBR. This expansion, while six months past the recommended suggested date of the Faculty Senate (fall, 1997), was very timely indeed. (Preliminary success stories of the SEM departments and of other mentoring programs, including that of the Timbuktu Academy and of the School of Nursing, contributed to this vote. In changing organizations, irrefutable internal and external examples of success are key guideposts.)
  2. We understood, from the onset, that time will be required before every faculty member develop a professional grasp of mentoring. We have entertained real concerns with ample explanations and with flexibility. We continue to recognize and avoid specious arguments on "a perfect definition of mentoring" or on "confusions between academic freedom and a license not to be accountable." After all, the Faculty Senate has facts, figures, and actual deeds to demonstrate its understanding and defense of academic freedom! It had the moral and professional high ground as compared to a very small minority (5 out of 500) who attempted to oppose systemic mentoring by citing academic freedom. Oh, two of these five are currently delivering talks on "how every one has benefited from some mentoring, unwittingly or otherwise" and "how every competent and dedicated faculty member can transform his or her ad-hoc or informal mentoring into a systemic one that is holistic and well informed!" (Flexibly means accommodating the needs, concerns, and input of mentors and of mentees. Every faculty member is an "emperor." Emperors do listen to each other. You can get them to do anything, provided you prove—in writing—that it is for the survival or the competitiveness of the empire and its emperors!)
  3. The "system approach," i.e., distributed responsibilities and shared credits, continues to be
utilized throughout. Systemic efforts, by failing to understand or recognize the role of some

constituents (faculty, students, staff, administrators, funding agencies, etc.) often place

themselves in jeopardy. (It takes an entire university to mentor a student, including that

student! Sagacity is needed to prevent this reality from serving as the scapegoat for the few,

if any, who may not want to contribute their shares!)

(10)Bagayoko developed a project aimed at the integration of technologies and of new knowledge in "New Models for Teaching, Mentoring, and Learning." The Chancellor decided to devote $300,000 of Title III-HBCU funds per year, for five years, to the implementation of this project. Effective as of October, 1997, this project is to continue till September, 2002. The Internet is playing an increasingly important role in the mentoring activities across the campus. E-mail communication facilitates getting in touch in a way that was not available before. (If mentoring is really important, than seek or provide funding for it, when needed! Sustained funding is the issue, not a passing, one time deal.) Enhancement & Expansion of the Mentoring Activities of the Timbuktu Academy

Please refer to http://suphys.phys.subr.edu/phys/ for details. The Timbuktu Academy, every summer, provides extensive academic enrichment and mentoring services to seventy (70) middle school students in its Summer Science Institute for Middle School; forty (40) high school students in its residential, intensive programs known as the Summer Science Institute (for 20 11th graders) and Challenge 2000 (for 20 10th-12th grade students together); twenty (20) high-achieving high school graduates in its Summer Bridge Institute at the Timbuktu Academy. The year-around, systemic undergraduate mentoring program of the Academy serves 100 scholars and affiliate students. (The Scholars, around 50, received direct financial support pursuant to funding by ONR and NASA.) The Graduate Research Excellence at the Timbuktu Academy (GREAT) is the newest mentoring program of the Academy. It started in 1996 and is funded by the Louisiana Board of Regents.

In addition to enhancing the regular mentoring activities of the Academy, the US Presidential Award for Excellence in Science, Mathematics, and Engineering Mentoring made possible two distinctive extensions of the Academy.

The first one consisted of volunteering the services of the Academy and of LAMP to assist NAFEO in the implementation of the High Tech Expo for undergraduate students. Due in part to our assistance that was gladly accepted by NAFEO, undergraduate students had a full day of technical presentations at the 1997 and 1998 NAFEO conferences in Washington, D.C. Well over 20 papers were presented and over 50 undergraduate and graduate students participated in the day-long scientific/engineering activity, each of the past two years. In 1997, Dr. William McHenry, the former AMP director at NSF, engaged, for 45 minutes, the participants in lively discussions on preparing for graduate school, applying for graduate school, funding for graduate studies, and doing research. In 1998, Dr. Hicks, the current AMP program director, similarly spoke to the attendees.

The second development consisted of our co-sponsorship of a state-wide science and mathematics competition for high school students across the state of Louisiana – from all ethnic backgrounds. This annual competition, initiated on April 7, 1997, is named after a former president of the Southern University and A&M College System, Dr. Dolores R. Spikes. Five hundred fifty (550) high school students participated in day-long written examinations in algebra, calculus, trigonometry, physics, biology, chemistry, etc. A ceremony was held to recognize the students with the highest scores in the various categories. One of many messages that were loud and clear was that "it is cool to learn science and mathematics."

Publications and Presentations

Bagayoko published seven (7) papers and one (1) book that are directly germane to systemic mentoring and the related teaching and program development activities. These publications, while grounded in research and the current sum of knowledge, were primarily concerned with providing "empowering information" to students, parents, teachers, faculty members, and others as opposed to demonstrating the author’s scholarship! Delivering "educational extension" services, analogous to the phenomenally successful "agricultural extension" services, was the aim. The formal publications noted below are a minute portion of the extensive dissemination of mentoring information, by the Timbuktu Academy, to over 10,000 individuals from 1996 to 1998. Important mass-media publications are not included.

From the fall of 1996 to the fall of 1998, Bagayoko made twenty-three (23) presentations on mentoring. They included 13 national, 7 state-wide, and 3 university-wide presentations that respectively reached 785, 347, and 563 individuals (faculty members, students, and others.) As a rule, these presentations acknowledge NSF support (US Presidential Award) and the support of the Timbuktu Academy by the Department of the Navy, Office of Naval Research (ONR). They do not include the tens of presentations to the pre-college and college scholars of the Timbuktu Academy and to their parents and relatives. These Academy presentations reached 2-3,000 students, parents, teachers, and faculty members per year.

Recommendation

The saga of mentoring at the Timbuktu Academy and at Southern University and A&M College (SUBR) sheds light on some pivotal constructs whose importance cannot be overemphasized. The US Presidential Award allowed us to synthesize these constructs and to map-out relatively simple strategies that can empower individuals and institutions to replicate the holistic and systemic mentoring activities of the Timbuktu Academy, of SUBR, and of others.

In a family, a school, a department, a college or university, an agency, a corporation, or a research laboratory, it is pivotal that the reasons, necessity, and benefits of "what is to be requested from people, i.e., "systemic mentoring," be established rigorously. Publications of the Timbuktu Academy provides such reasons, necessities, and benefits for mentoring from K-graduate School and beyond. (Please see Education, Vol. 115, No. 1, pp.31-39, 1994 and at http://suphys.phys.subr.edu/phys/timbuktu.htm under Virtual Mentoring Institute.) Further, biographies make a solid case for mentoring. They unfailingly note critical decisions and efforts that benefited from the experiences, rich repertoire, and wisdom of mentors. The subtitles of this report identify some essential benefits of mentoring.

Once the needs and benefits are amply known and thoroughly understood, then we believe that the expressions in Italics, in (1) through (10) above, provide fundamental steps for promoting systemic mentoring. We cannot over-emphasize the importance of the two publications noted above and of similar ones. Genuine knowledge is not only the organizing principle of our thoughts and activities in research but also in mentoring!

Our strong appeal to the reader to consult the referenced publications stems from the need to know and understand the "creation of educational, research, and professional value added" from K through graduate school and beyond. The integrated law of human performance or of practice, we submit, should be known by ALL. Indeed, it demonstrates, rigorously, that all individuals can learn and discover. It further shows that what an individual does learn or discovers is partly determined by his "exposure, resources, support system (i.e., mentoring), adequate efforts or practice over extended periods of time." Failure to understand this point may be a pervasive and implicit roadblock to "educational excellence." This is particularly true when one has some students, parents, teachers, faculty members, etc. who mistakenly believe that a lack of some "innate ability" is the easy "excuse" for their inaction. We proved that effort partly begets and certainly enhances abilities, not just the results of their applications! (Education, Vol. 115, No. 1, pp. 31-39, 1994 and "Mentoring: A strategy for increasing minority participation," available at http://suphys.phys.subr.edu/phys/timbuktu.htm under "Virtual Mentoring Institute.")

 

PUBLICATIONS
D. Bagayoko, Ph.D.
(bagayoko@phys.subr.edu)
Professor of Physics and Chancellor’s Fellow
Director, Timbuktu Academy
(Publications, from fall, 1996 to fall, 1998 that are directly related to the US Presidential Award for Excellence in Science, Mathematics, and Engineering Mentoring).

Bagayoko published seven (7) papers and one (1) book that are directly germane to systemic mentoring and to the related teaching and program development activities. These publications, while grounded in research and the current sum of knowledge, were primarily concerned with providing "empowering information" to students, parents, teachers, faculty members, and others as opposed to demonstrating the author’s scholarship! Delivering "educational extension" services, analogous to the phenomenally successful "agricultural extension" services, was the aim. The formal publications noted below are a minute portion of the extensive dissemination of mentoring information, by the Timbuktu Academy, to over 10,000 individuals from 1996 to 1998. Important mass-media publications are not included.

PUBLICATIONS (Scholarly work on mentoring, teaching and learning, educational research; for, what is not recorded is likely to be lost and likely not to be replicated)

7. Reflections on Mentoring. Proceedings, July, 1998 National Workshop on the Workforce for the 21st Century, Washington, D.C., Renaissance Hotel. (Publication to appear in 1999.)

6. "Early Guidance Pays Off: Mentoring students in science, engineering and math promotes success." Diola Bagayoko, Resource Magazine, American Society of Agricultural Engineering, published by the Nat. Congress for Community Economic Development (NCCED), Vol. 5, No. 4, page 29, April, (1998).

5. "Southern University to Launch Ph.D. in Science/Mathematics Education" Diola Bagayoko, published in LaCEPT Report, a biannual magazine publication of LaCEPT, Winter 1997-98.

4. "Towards a Framework for the Assessment and Evaluation of Mentoring Processes and Results." A contributed paper for the Second National Symposium for the US Presidential Award for Excellence in Science, Mathematics, and Engineering Mentoring, Washington, D.C., September, 1997. (Available on the web at http://suphys.phys.subr.edu/phys/timbuktu.htm, under "Virtual Mentoring Institute.)

3. "The Timbuktu Academy." Proceedings, first National Symposium for the US Presidential Award for Excellence in Science, Mathematics, and Engineering Mentoring, Washington, D.C., September 1997.

2. "Mentoring: A Strategy for Increasing Minority Participation." Proceedings, National Conference on "Exploring the Role of Social and Behavioral Science Careers in the 21st Century; New Orleans, LA, April 18-19, 1997. (Available at the above specified web site; publication to appear in early 1999.)

1. "The Power Law of Performance and Cognitive Condensation for Mastery Teaching and Learning,"
D. Bagayoko, Fall, 1996 (a 33 page document on noted subject). (Available at the web site of the Timbuktu Academy http://suphys.phys.subr.edu/phys/timbuktu.htm)

PUBLICATION (Book co-authorship, with Prof. Ora Plummer as the first author): "Writing for Success: A User-Friendly Manual for Effective Communication." Publisher: McGraw-Hill, ISBN No. 0-07-154196-9 (1998). The primacy of languages as vehicles of thought and the needs of our students dictated the writing of this book that addresses technical communication.  

PROFESSIONAL PRESENTATIONS
By D. Bagayoko, Ph.D.

(bagayoko@phys.subr.edu)
Professor of Physics and Chancellor’s Fellow
Director, the Timbuktu Academy
(Cumulative Listing: Fall 1996 to Fall 98)
(For, one goes to conferences take and, occasionally, to give)

From the fall of 1996 to September, 1998, Bagayoko made twenty three (23) presentations on mentoring. They included 13 national, 7 state-wide, and 3 university-wide presentations that respectively reached 785, 347, and 563 individuals (faculty members, students, and others.) As a rule, these presentations acknowledge NSF support (US Presidential Award) and the support of the Timbuktu Academy by the Department of the Navy, Office of Naval Research (ONR). They do not include the tens of presentations to the pre-college and college scholars of the Timbuktu Academy and to their parents and relatives. These Academy presentations reach 2,000-3,000 students, parents, teachers, faculty members, etc. per year.

23. July 29-30, 1998. US Workforce Development Workshop, organized by the National Science

and Technology Committee (NSTC) and the White House Office of Science and Technology (OST), Washington, Renaissance Hotel, Washington, D.C. Presentation: Developing National Resources, US Presidential Awardees for Excellence in Mentoring. Audience estimated at 110 national leaders.

22. May 12, 1998, SUBR’s Planning Week, Cotillion Ballroom, Student Union. Panel Presentation: "Systemic Mentoring and Student Retention." (The presentation and accompanying handout placed systemic mentoring on a rigorous scientific basis, underscored the intrinsic need for mentoring for enhanced student retention.) Audience of 400 faculty and staff members.

21. May 13, 1998, SUBR Planning Week, Cotillion Ballroom, Student Union. Speaker at the grant-writing workshop: the development of responsive and competitive proposals; funding to be acquired is for basic and state-of-the art equipment and resources for the integration of new knowledge, telecommunication and Internet technologies, and of reform-imbued new models into teaching, mentoring, and learning. Audience: 143 faculty and staff members—from 8 am to 12 Noon. )

20. April 17, 1998, 12th Student High Tech Expo, 23rd National Conference of the National Association for Equal Opportunity (NAFEO) in Higher Education, Washington Hilton and Towers, Washington, D.C. Chair of Presentations, Editor of Technical Abstracts, and Speaker:

"Writing a Technical Paper and Making a Technical Presentation—a guide for students." Audience: 50.

19. March 19, 1998. Baton Rouge Hilton Hotel, 1998 Statewide Research Conference of DOE/EPSCoR and of the Louisiana alliance for Minority Participation (LAMP). Plenary, keynote address by Bagayoko on "Strengthening the Science, Mathematics, Engineering, and Technology (SMET) Pipeline."Audience: 50 faculty members and students.

 

18. February 21, 1998, Baton Rouge Hilton Hotel, Louisiana, USA. New Theories, Discoveries, and Application of Superconductivity (NEW3SC) International Conference: Invited. Keynote Address: "New theories, discoveries, and applications of super-mentoring," "D. Bagayoko. Audience: 70 physicists from around the world.

 

17. January 30-31, 1998, 5th Annual LaCEPT Statewide Conference, LSU Union, Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Session Chair and Panelist: "The Less That is More, Implication of TIMSS for undergraduate Education and Teacher Preparation." 3/30/98, 2:15 to 3:30 PM. Audience: 20 physics faculty members.

16. January 16, 1998, Ascension Seminar on Curriculum Reform. Presentation: College Connection Panelist to address high school to college transition issues. D. Bagayoko. Audience: 20 pre-college teachers.

 

15. December 1-4, 1997, New Orleans, Louisiana. 13th National Conference of the Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR). Invited presentation: "Mentoring, An enabling process for quality learning,…" D. Bagayoko. Audience: 200 faculty and staff members.

14. August 7, 1997. Rehabilitation Capacity Building, Region VI Consortium: Grant Writing, Technical Assistance, and Follow-Up Workshop, Parkway Hilton Hotel, Dallas, Texas. Invited Presentation: "Mentoring and Grant Writing." Audience of thirty (32) faculty and staff members from HBCUs.

13. July, 1997. 1997 MainSTey National Workshop. Baton Rouge Hilton Hotel, Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Invited Presentation: "MENTORING: An enabling Process for Quality Learning."

Audience: thirty (30) science faculty members from HBCUs.

12. May 23, 1997. 1997 MainSTey National Conference. Baton Rouge Hilton Hotel, Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Audience of twenty five (25) faculty members from HBCUs. Invited Presentation: "MENTORING: An Enabling Process for Quality Learning."

11. April 28, 1997. Regional Workshop on Grant Writing. This workshop was partly co-sponsored by the US Presidential Award for Excellence in Science, Mathematics, and Engineering Mentoring- -for the focus on proposal development for students and junior faculty mentoring projects. Audience: one hundred twenty (120) university faculty and staff. Invited Luncheon Speech/Presentation: "MENTORING: for Students and for Faculty Members."

10. April 18, 1997. National Science Foundation (NSF) sponsored National Conference on the Role of Social and Behavioral Sciences in the Alliances for Minority Participation (AMP) Programs. Invited speaker at the plenary session: "MENTORING: A Strategy for Increasing Minority Participation." Audience of about one hundred (100).

09. April 11, 1997. National Conference of NAFEO. Session Chair, for six hours, of College High Tech Expo presentations by students. Eight SUBR students presented at this session co-sponsored by LAMP and the US Presidential Award for Excellence in Mentoring. Audience: a minimum of eighty (80) college students and faculty members.

08. April 5, 1997. National Beta Kappa Chi Conference at the Baton Rouge Hilton Hotel, Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Presentation: "The Model of the Timbuktu Academy." Audience: 15.

07.April 3, 1997. National Convention of the National Science Teachers Association, New
Orleans Convention Center, New Orleans, Louisiana. Chair of the Session on the Systemic Educational Reform Efforts of the Louisiana Alliance for Minority Participation (LAMP). Audience: 10 teachers and faculty members.

06.February 7, 1997. 1997 National Conference of Quality Education for Minorities (QEM)
Network. Chair of the Session on Student Mentoring and Educational Reform Models that Work, Washington, D.C. Audience: 30 faculty members.

05. February 7, 1997. Annual meeting of the Louisiana Academy of Science (LAS), Alexandria, LA. Presentation (D. Bagayoko and T. Williams - Graduate Student): "A Comprehensive Approach to Student Mentoring." Audience: 20 faculty members and students.

04. January 31, 1997. Annual Conference, Louisiana Collaborative for Excellence in the Preparation of Teachers (LaCEPT). Panelist to discuss "Educational Reforms as Applied to the Teaching and Learning of College Physics." Audience: Twenty five (25) faculty members.

03. November 25, 1996. State-wide DOE/EPSCoR Conference, Doubletree Hotels, Metairie, Louisiana: Invited Presentation: "Creating Educational Value Added. Who is Responsible?" Audience: Eighty (80) students, federal and university researchers and staff members.

02. November, 13, 1996. Retention 2000 National Conference, University of Maryland at College Park, Maryland. Presentation: "Expectations, Motivations, and Student Retention." Audience of Eighty Seven (87) teachers, school and college personnel.

01.September 25, 1996. Renaissance Mayflower Hotel, Washington, D.C.. Presidential Awards
for excellence in Science, Mathematics, and Engineering Mentoring, Mentoring for the 21st Century: A symposium. Panelist for a Plenary Session on "Developing Effective Mentoring Models." Audience: Over Sixty Five (65) National leaders, Awardees, university officials.